Posts Tagged ‘shoes’

Mid 1500s Welted Shoes

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

I keep on worrying that, at some point, someone is going to say, “Hey! You made a pair of shoes exactly like that back in 2011!” To that, I would inevitably respond, “No shoes for you!” =)

There are, actually, some differences in this pair. The sole is pasted in and there isn’t a heel stiffener (I’ve found that the stitching itself acts quite well as a stiffener).

Mid-Late 16th Strapped and Bound

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

Hm, a second look at the subject title kind of makes me want to change it, but nope! Going to leave it as is. =) A fun pair that I bound all the way around the straps to reinforce them. I think the black looks absolutely smashing, and you can just imagine lovely braids or ribbons through the straps. There is a single heel lift pegged on to the bottom. Since I’ve been pasting and pegging lifts, I haven’t had anyone report failures, which seems to me to be a good indication that they’re hanging in there and withstanding the test of time.

Now, I need to get my act together and start making some period lasts…

1550s Pumpes

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

A pair for the incomparable Elizabeth M. You’ll note that the binding strip on these has been snipped to give it a decorative look. This is in lieu of turning down the top of the upper and stitching it down. I’ve done it both ways, but I have to admit that this is easier, since you’re not dealing with having to make tunnel stitches all the time which are something of a pain.

And no, that isn’t a typo – they were called pumps, pumpes, and any other alternate spelling you can come up with =)

10th Century Anglo-Scandinavian Ankle Boots

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

I promised a pair of shoes to Rodney W., in a nice rich cordovan leather. At the last minute, I also decided to bind the edges. Typical overlap construction, two toggle, with the ubiquitous “A” where the sole continues upwards at the heel. I tried some new construction techniques on these shoes, and I was surprised with how effective they were.

From “Leather and Leatherworking in Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval York,” we are told that Ankle boots of this time were primarily made in one of two ways.
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